2021 Department of Art Honors Exhibition

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We are delighted to present the work of the 2021 Department of Art Honors Program students of and in this most extraordinary time. Working in isolation during a difficult period this remarkable group of 9 people hung on through tenuous connections and multiple planes of uncertainty to forage and forge work that speaks to our lives now. We invite you to peruse the virtual exhibition below for a sampling of their projects reflecting a broad range of individual creative practices, research and making, across media. You will float, pause, fly again- rather like all of us during this last year, though a multiplicity of forms that ask what it is to be becoming.

• Sarah R. Brady, Assistant Professor of Art (Honors Fall)
• Laurel Beckman, Professor of Art & Honors Advisor (Honors Winter)
• Alex Lukas, Assistant Professor of Art (Honors Spring)

Thank you to Troy Small, Kevin Clancy, Joel Sherman, Alex Lukas, and all involved in making this happen!

 
 
Natalie Cappellini

Paper Doll is an interactive sculptural self-portrait in which the audience is invited to take a painted clothing item and affix it to the magnetized figure, recreating the childhood experience of playing with a paper doll. This piece addresses self-expression and perception, and nostalgia.

Paper Doll, 2021
Paper Doll, 2021

Gouache on paper, wood.

Paper Doll, 2021
Paper Doll, 2021

Gouache on paper, wood.

Paper Doll, 2021
Paper Doll, 2021

Gouache on paper, wood.

Paper Doll, 2021
Paper Doll, 2021

Gouache on paper, wood.

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Mike Demavivas

My current work explores the relationship of space, light, and structure within isolation in a pandemic. Using light, space, color, miniatures, projection, and digital editing creates imaginary environments with the residue of modernism in a 3D space within a space exploring the emotion of our current social climate.

Red Moon, 2021
Red Moon, 2021

Acrylic on Canvas, 30” x 40”

Fracture, 2021
Fracture, 2021

Oil on Paper, 16” x 30”

Red Moon, 2021
Red Moon, 2021

Acrylic on Canvas, 30” x 40”

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Kaitlyn Grulkowski

The Most Important Component explores the ways in which unseen, internal feelings of stress can be exhibited in a physical manner using body language. Stacked upon one another, these disembodied extremities display discomfort, tension, and adrenaline while offering a visual commentary on the sublime of life and its experiences. Although initially tethered to negative connotations of death and fear, Cadaver invites the viewer to openly stare at the inevitable and use the figure as a tool for therapy and spiritual healing. This piece changes in context, from morbid to the humorous, when the environment around it shifts as well.

Cadaver, 2021
Cadaver, 2021

Twine, yarn, tinfoil, plaster, tape, wire, paper towel, and hot glue, 28” x 24” x 36”

Cadaver, 2021
Cadaver, 2021

Twine, yarn, tinfoil, plaster, tape, wire, paper towel, and hot glue, 28” x 24” x 36”

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Madeline Miller

These pieces exhibit five femme deities in their natural environments. They dominate their landscapes with immense strength and confidence. Project yourself onto these guardians and feel their power inside you! Find your favorite goddess, face her, and tell yourself, “you are the strongest thing that is.”

Mushroom Mama, 2021
Mushroom Mama, 2021

Ink + copics, 8” x 12” (Digital print: 16" x 24")

Figurehead Femme, 2021
Figurehead Femme, 2021

Ink + copics, 8” x 12” (Digital print: 16" x 24")

Mushroom Mama, 2021
Mushroom Mama, 2021

Ink + copics, 8” x 12” (Digital print: 16" x 24")

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Tess Reinhardt

This 14-minute video is a selection of 9 videos, animations, and sound works, that the artist made as an undergraduate student. Through experimentations with time, motion, and opacity, the artist questions orientation and order, in the context of the digital age (or more specifically, zoom school). While most of their work was made at the University of California, Santa Barbara campus, in this compilation, the artist also includes a few pieces that they made remotely, from their home in Los Angeles, CA. Ultimately, these videos, animations, and sound experiments shed light on the aesthetics of decay, longing, and incorporeality, within a hybrid environment.
Watch the video

teen spirit, 2021
teen spirit, 2021

Video, (2:23)

T’S SPACE CLUB W/ DJ CRUNCHYROLL SUPREME!!!, 2020
T’S SPACE CLUB W/ DJ CRUNCHYROLL SUPREME!!!, 2020

Video, (3:29)

Untitled, 2020
Untitled, 2020

Digital print, 22" x 22"

teen spirit, 2021
teen spirit, 2021

Video, (2:23)

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Ruby Saltzman

These analog double exposure photographs convey the haze of pandemic life. They illustrate the passing of time and fogginess of this past year. These works examine the nostalgia and longing one might experience for life pre-covid, mixed with the stark reality of our lives today. Through these images,
I explore the essence of time and memory.

Years Lassitude, 2020
Years Lassitude, 2020

Medium: Double exposure analog photographs, printed on acetate, 24” x “36

Years Lassitude, 2020
Years Lassitude, 2020

Medium: Double exposure analog photographs, printed on acetate, 24” x “36

Years Lassitude, 2020
Years Lassitude, 2020

Medium: Double exposure analog photographs, printed on acetate, 24” x “36

Years Lassitude, 2020
Years Lassitude, 2020

Medium: Double exposure analog photographs, printed on acetate, 24” x “36

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Eva Smith

These works examine the practice of archiving as a mode for collage making. By sourcing from materials that I have collected without any intention, I explore the meaning and connectedness of collected items, words, and images that are free from projected conceptual restraints.

Loving, 2021
Loving, 2021

Collage, 20” x 22”

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Annli Tico 

IV Landscape is inspired by the natural landscape of Isla Vista, and the changing relationship that I have had with nature during the pandemic. I have spent the last year or so spending more time within this unique area, and the piece displays a sense of melancholy at the thought of leaving as a graduating senior. Underbelly is an experimental piece made using found materials and scrap fabric. It explores the different textures and shapes of textiles and crocheted yarn. This piece is meant to create a surreal landscape that one can immerse themselves inside of.

Underbelly, 2020
Underbelly, 2020

Chicken wire, Textiles, 96” x 60” x 42”

Underbelly, 2020
Underbelly, 2020

Chicken wire, Textiles, 96” x 60” x 42”

IV Landscape, 2021
IV Landscape, 2021

Watercolor, 30.5” x 28”

Underbelly, 2020
Underbelly, 2020

Chicken wire, Textiles, 96” x 60” x 42”

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